The Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States (SIDS) took place from 1-4 September 2014, in Apia, Samoa, on the theme of "The Sustainable Development of SIDS Through Genuine and Durable Partnerships." The Conference produced an outcome document, titled "SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway," which was negotiated during the preparatory process at UN Headquarters in New York, US, and adopted during the closing plenary.

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ICRI News

On Sunday 14th September, five species of sharks and two manta ray species received protection under the United Nation’s Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) when formal measures to regulate their international trade come into effect.

The five sharks and two manta rays species include Scalloped Hammerhead Shark Sphyrna lewini, Great Hammerhead Shark Sphyrna mokarran, Smooth Hammerhead Shark Sphyrna zygaena, Oceanic Whitetip Shark Carcharinus longimanus, Porbeagle Shark Lamna nasus and manta rays Manta spp.

All the sharks except Porbeagle are caught for their fins, which are exported to East Asia, especially Hong Kong, where they are the key ingredient in sharks-fin soup, an expensive, but popular delicacy.

Most Caribbean coral reefs will disappear in 20 years if we don't restore the population of fish that eat seaweed, as Caribbean reefs are gradually getting smothered by algae. This is the message of the new report: Status and Trends of Caribbean Coral Reefs: 1970-2012 released today as the result of a three-year joint effort of the International Coral Reef Initiative’s (ICRI) Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network (GCRMN), the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP).

Tropical and small island developing States (SIDS) are most at risk from exposure and vulnerability to coastal hazards, according to ‘Coasts at Risk: An Assessment of Coastal Risks and the Role of Environmental Solutions.' The report uses an indicator-based approach to assess risks from exposure and vulnerability to coastal hazards and identifies where environmental degradation increases these risks. The report then considers how environmental solutions, such as conservation and restoration, can contribute to risk reduction and conservation goals.

Washington, 27 June 2014 — The Global Environment Facility (GEF) through the World Bank has contributed US$7.2 million to the Caribbean Biodiversity Fund (CBF) to promote the conservation, protection, management and expansion of national protected area systems and other areas of biodiversity significance across the Eastern Caribbean region.

The marine and coastal resources of the Caribbean—its coral reefs, beaches, fisheries and mangroves—serve as an essential economic engine. However, unsustainable coastal development, climate change and overfishing, as well as land-based sources of sediment and pollution are negatively impacting the region’s marine and coastal ecosystems.

Bonn, Germany, 11 June 2014 - Some of the world’s most endangered species, many of them migratory, are facing unprecedented threats from climate change, habitat destruction to overexploitation and pollution which has led to a number of new listing proposals for consideration at CMS COP 11 - a key international wildlife conference scheduled to take place 4-9 November 2014 in Quito, Ecuador.

In celebration of the Coral Triangle today and for years to come, EcoAdapt and WWF present the Coral Triangle Climate Adaptation Marketplace. The Coral Triangle Climate Adaptation Marketplace is an online portal that aims to connect funding sources and climate adaptation projects in the Coral Triangle region.

"By linking projects to funds and funds to projects, the Marketplace contributes to the region by streamlining vital and often lacking information needed to develop climate change adaptation projects and create positive regional outcomes," said Dr. Lara Hansen, EcoAdapt Chief Scientist and Executive Director.

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