ICRI News

A blueprint to respond to coral bleaching and other recent impacts on the Great Barrier Reef was the focus of this week’s two-day Reef Summit in Townsville, Australia.

Hosted by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, the summit — Managing for resilience— was the first of its kind for the Reef and involved more than 70 leading marine experts from around the world.

It was a response to unprecedented back-to-back coral bleaching events on the Great Barrier Reef and aimed at determining what else could be done in addition to the already extensive actions being undertaken to protect the Reef.

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Chairman Dr Russell Reichelt said coral reefs worldwide were under threat from a range of pressures, particularly the effects of climate ch

From April to September 2017, l’Aquarium de Paris presents a big exhibition on coral reefs. Its aim is to publicize the diversity and beauty of underwater. As well as initiatives intended to preserve this unique and important heritage for humanity. In this context, art and science find themselves at the crossroads of intelligence and sensitivities on an ambitious and unique artistic journey mixing installations, sculptures, street art and photographs.

The Nature Foundation encourages the community of St.Maarten/St.Martin to use Coral Isles Reef Friendly sunscreen/suntan lotions, Coral Isles Sunscreen is specifically formulated not to have any negative impacts on coral reefs while at the same time protecting users from the sun.

Over the past 30 years, Sint Maarten has lost over 80% of its coral reefs—an alarming statistic that is made even more disturbing by the fact that this has become a trend throughout the Caribbean Region and Globally. Although climate change (global warming) has long been identified as a primary contributor to coral bleaching, scientists have also identified pollutants in our oceans causing significant damage to coral. Many of these man-made pollutants are common ingredients found in sunscreens.

The Government of France convened a High-Level Meeting of Ministers from the Wider Caribbean Region in recognition of global commitments (Sustainable Development Goal 14 on Oceans, Sustainable Development Goal 6 on Water and Sanitation, Improving Oceans Management and Reducing Pollution as part of the UN Environment #CleanSeas Campaign). This meeting, the first of its kind to be held in association with the Conference of Contracting Parties, helped gain additional political support for ratification and implementation of the Cartagena Convention and its Protocols, and adopted the Cayenne Statement (below):

We, the representatives of the Governments of the wider Caribbean region,

2 February 2017: In briefings for Member States and civil society, the co-facilitators and co-hosts of the UN Ocean Conference emphasized the potential contributions of Sustainable Development Goal 14 to the overall 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and called for a focus on solutions, actions and concrete recommendations.

5 January 2017 - New climate model projections of the world's coral reefs reveal which reefs will be hit first by annual coral bleaching, an event that poses the gravest threat to one of the Earth's most important ecosystems.

These high-resolution projections, based on global climate models, predict when and where annual coral bleaching will occur. The projections show that reefs in Taiwan and around the Turks and Caicos archipelago will be among the world's first to experience annual bleaching.

Other reefs, like those off the coast of Bahrain, in Chile and in French Polynesia, will be hit decades later, according to research recently published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports.

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